‘Come Together’ at MetroWest

Celebrating women’s creative contribute to MetroWest Footscray

Install!

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Lonnie Holley

Idk why this dumb embed isn’t working but can you please watch Holley’s video All Round the Bend it’s so nice, it captures in the song his belief in divine intervention to create his artwork and that his artwork’s direction really comes from within.

 

Lonnie Holley “Power of a Mother,” Credit Gillian Laub for The New York Times.png
Power of a Mother photographed in the artists Atlanta home by Gillian Gaub for NY Times

Holley is a man of many myths and talents. Born in Jim Crow-era Birmingham, Alabama, as the seventh of 27 children, Holley traveled across the South and held a wide array of jobs before making his first artwork at the age of 29.

Well known for his assemblages, Holley incorporates natural and man-made objects into totemic sculptures. Materials such as steel scrap, sandstone, plastic flowers, crosses, and defunct machines commemorate places, people, and events. The exhibition will feature a selection of sculptures and drawings on loan from the artist. In addition to these works, Holley will create site specific installations reflective of the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his creative process.

at Atlanta Contemporary

at Atlanta Contemporary 2

at Atlanta Contemporary 3

Text and following images from Atlanta Contemporary for a solo exhibition titled “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship” at Atlanta Contemporary

Thornton Dial

Mr. Dial Has Something to Say, 2007

from Celia Carey on Vimeo.

Thornton Dial was born on a cotton plantation and did steel work, never learning to read or write – and was a self-taught artist. Discovered by Lonnie Holley, he was later approached by Bill Arnett who bought Dial’s work into the white world of art. Controversy that tarnished the two men’s reputations provides insight into the life of black artists and ‘outsider’ art through the eyes of white art institutions. The positive return of the story becomes that the black artist is given legitimacy and been accepted, their art being taken in by the institutions that had initially devalued them.